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Also, check out our Calendar of Events. Come and see us at our public events, introduce yourself, and let’s start the conversation about how you could fit at JPL. We’re always looking for intrepid explorers to join our quest.

Friday, October 9, 2020

In this illustration, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich spacecraft - the world's latest sea-level satellite - is in space with its deployable solar panels extended

The U.S.-European partnership will track sea level height. Learn more about the mission in this live event.



Thursday, October 8, 2020

Perseverance's Radar Imager for Mars' Subsurface Experiment (RIMFAX) uses radar waves to probe the ground

The agency's newest rover will use the first ground-penetrating radar instrument on the Martian surface to help search for signs of past microbial life.



Wednesday, October 7, 2020

NASA-JPL scientists and engineers working on the Sentinel-6 mission. Clockwise from top left: Severine Fournier, Shailen Desai, Ben Hamlington, Shannon Statham, and Parag Vaze

Launching soon from the California coast, the satellite will track sea levels worldwide. A new video series introduces some of the NASA JPL scientists and engineers involved in the mission.



Friday, October 2, 2020

In this illustration, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich spacecraft - the world's latest sea-level satellite - orbits Earth with its deployable solar panels extended

Set for launch in November, the Earth-observing satellite will closely monitor sea level and provide atmospheric data to support weather forecasting and climate models.



Thursday, October 1, 2020

The HiRISE camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took this image of a crater cluster on Mars

It's the first time machine learning has been used to find previously unknown craters on the Red Planet.



Thursday, October 1, 2020

A disk of hot material around a supermassive black hole emits a burst of visible light, which travels out to a ring of dust that subsequently emits infrared light

Matter swirling around supermassive black holes creates bursts of light that "echo" in nearby dust clouds. These traveling signals could serve as a new cosmic yardstick.